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Vaccination Debate: Tenn. congressman-elect claims CDC may be withholding vaccine research

(Photo: Pixabay / MGN)

Tennessee Congressman-elect, and physician, Mark Green is making the case that vaccines may cause autism.

However, in a statement Wednesday, he said some of his comments have been misconstrued. Green explained his kids are vaccinated, and he encourages people to vaccinate their kids.

Is there any link between vaccines and autism? It's a debate that pops up from time to time. Here's one doctor's answer:

“Vaccines are safe, they do not cause autism,” said Dr. William Schaffner.

Dr. Schaffner has been with the Vanderbilt Medical Center for more than 50 years, and he says this is one thing that good science from around the world is in complete agreement on.

On Tuesday, Tennessee Representative-elect Mark Green said he believes the CDC may be withholding information regarding vaccine research, saying the agency may have fraudulently managed the data, and that there could be a link to autism.

Dr. Schaffner says this idea has long been discarded.

“There was a British physician who performed a profoundly flawed and dishonest study that got a lot of traction, and that started that whole discussion,” Schaffner explained.

The controversy has been studied all around the world, and he says all of the health organizations agree vaccines have nothing to do with autism.

Still, not everyone is on board.

“I've heard of children, personally known, that have died because of vaccination,” said Nashville resident Paul Brown.

Brown said there may be a few good vaccinations out there like Polio, but he basically believes vaccines are a scam by the pharmaceutical companies.

Dr. Schaffner says, thanks to vaccines, we have virtually eliminated diseases like Measles.

“The only way they can come back is if parents don't vaccinate their children and they're imported from abroad, and we keep seeing that,” Schaffner said.

He says all vaccines must meet enormous safety conditions, and must show that they're not only effective in preventing an illness, but also that they're safe to the person.

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