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Tennessee Firearms Association takes aim at legislation on semi-auto rifle accessories

The Tennessee Firearms Association (TFA) is taking aim at a bill seeking to make it a felony for anyone in possession or who manufactures a device/accessory that increases the rate of fire of a semi-automatic rifle. PHOTO-Bump Stock-MGN

NASHVILLE, Tenn.-The Tennessee Firearms Association (TFA) is taking aim at a bill seeking to make it a felony for anyone in possession or who manufactures a device/accessory that increases the rate of fire of a semi-automatic rifle.

SB 1472/HB 1461 states the following:

(1) Knowingly purchasing, using, possessing, or attempting to purchase, use, or possess any part, combination of parts, component, device, attachment, or accessory that is designed or functions to accelerate the rate of fire of a semi-automatic rifle, such as a trigger crank, bump stock, or bump-fire device (rate-of-fire accelerator);

(2) Knowingly manufacturing, selling, offering for sale, or displaying for sale in this state a rate-of-fire accelerator;

(3) Intentionally or knowingly possessing, manufacturing, transporting, repairing, or selling a semi-automatic rifle equipped, altered, or modified to include a rate-of-fire accelerator.

The TFA is taking particular issue with the language 'accessory that is designed or functions to accelerate the rate of fire.'

In a statement release, TFA Executive Director John Harris says " I wonder if these experts in the law and public policy realized that this legislation could make it a felony to possess a belt, rubber bands or shoestrings."

The correlation being such items could be used to also speed up the rate of fire of a semi-automatic rifle. To this point, Harris says "Just imagine the number of snowflakes who might suddenly be at risk of felony prosecution merely for owning or possessing a belt, tennis shoes, or the known dangerous item - a rubber band."

Harris says the recent public statement by the NRA calling for additional regulation of bump stocks in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas could pose a "battle" when it comes to passing the bill.

"We will not know whether the NRA's Tennessee lobbyist will support this bill or not," Harris states.

The Senate version of the bill has passed on second consideration and was referred to the Senate Judiciary Committee last week. The House bill has been assigned to the Civil Justice Subcommitee.

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