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TBI explains AMBER Alert criteria, Trinity Quinn case

Following the latest Tennessee AMBER Alert which resulted in a 15-year-old girl being charged in a Nashville murder, the TBI is clarifying it's AMBER Alert process. PHOTO: TBI

NASHVILLE, Tenn.--Following the latest Tennessee AMBER Alert which resulted in a 15-year-old girl being charged in a Nashville murder, the TBI is clarifying it's AMBER Alert process.

The TBI says whenever it receives a request for an AMBER Alert from a law enforcement agency, the TBI works to determine if it meets criteria to issue the alert. Though every case is fact-specific, the TBI says Wednesday's case involving Trinity Quinn did not meet criteria until the "situation changed overnight."

TBI spokesman Josh DeVine says normal criteria to launch a statewide AMBER Alert includes: The person being 17 years or younger, the child is in imminent danger of bodily injury or death, there is a description of the child, abductor or vehicle, and there is a direct tie to the state at the time of the request.

In the case of Quinn, who went missing from her Rhea County school on Monday, the Dayton Police Department couldn't definitely place her with Daniel Clark at the time. Clark also had no violent criminal history, so it was determined by the TBI Quinn's disappearance did not meet criteria for the AMBER Alert.

However, once Metro Nashville Police identified Quinn and Clark at the scene of the murder of an Exxon clerk employee, the TBI identified Clark as clearly having a "propensity for violence." Out of an abundance of caution, the TBI then issued an alert.

Both Quinn and Clark have been charged with criminal homicide, especially aggravated robbery, and attempted auto theft following interviews by police.

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