"Please Don't Talk To Anyone Else" - 01/10/14

  One of the most overused word in television news these days is "exclusive."  The Nashville tv news landscape is competitive and has been for decades.  Every news person worth his or her salt is eager to tell stories no one else knows about.  That's what it's all about, telling your viewers things they don't know but would be interested to hear.  Being first is the holy grail in journalism.  The root word of "news" is "new."  It's not as important as being right, but it's important. 

  In recent years, I've noticed something happening in Nashville news more and more.  Reporters at some television stations ask for interviews and then ask people like you not to speak to any other reporters who may call or stop by requesting comment.  I'm told there have even been instances where a reporter offers cash if you'll interview with them and tell everyone else no comment. 

  To me, that's wrong.  Journalism is a profession.  As a reporter, I'm searching for the truth and as many sides to the argument as I can identify.  I have never asked an interview subject not to speak with any of my colleagues.  After we talk, I synthesize the message they've shared with me, ask if I have an accurate understanding of thier position and then I thank them for speaking to me.  Not once have I ever said on the way out, please don't speak to anyone else.  Not once have I ever offered money in exchange for an interview.  I've had people ask.  I've had attorneys offer interviews with a client if I agree to steer clear of certain questions.  I always simply said thanks, but I can't agree to those terms.  It's intellectually dishonest.  It violates what I consider a sacred trust with my viewer.  I'm not for sale.  I'm your advocate.  I'm here to ask the questions you'd ask.

  I'm hearing so many examples of this kind of "reporting," I'm beginning to wonder if some news managers are encouraging or instructing their people to engage in this kind of newsgathering.  If that's happening, shame on both of you.  Shame on the news manager for violating what I consider a code of ethics.  And shame on any news reporter who bows to pressure to behave in this manner. 

  I don't say it's exclusive unless I know for sure this is a story you won't see anywhere else.  I have asked interview subjects to let me know if they interview with anyone else so I won't say "exclusive."  That's fair.  I respect my competitors.  I've always believed if I do everything I can think of to collect information, pictures, interviews I'll end of no worse than even with you at the end of the day.  I've made a career of putting my witts and work ethic against my competitors. 

  I consider this an honorable profession.  Anyone who engages in the practices I just described needs to check themselves, remember what business they're in and the position of trust they occupy.  I've been at this a long time.  My viewers come first.  It's not about me.  It's about you.  Telling you the truth to the best of my ability is what I promise.  It's all I'm selling.  And no matter how journalism changes, the truth and professional integrity never goes out of style.

 

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Last Update on December 18, 2014 08:09 GMT

FAT BIKES

SHERIDAN, Wyo. (AP) -- Cold and snowy? To some it's perfect bike weather. A new style of bike is gaining traction for winter use -- it's the so-called fat bike first developed in Alaska. The bike gets its name from the 4-inch wide tires that can get a grip in snow or sand. The tires are about twice as wide as those on a conventional mountain bike. Jeff Stine is the co-owner of Backcountry Bike and Mountain Works in Sheridan, Wyoming. He tells the Sheridan Press a fat bike buyer can get two sets of wheels, for summer or winter use. But a winter bike could give your wallet a chill. Prices start at about $1,500.

WREATH THIEF

WESTERLY, R.I. (AP) -- The wreath thief has been busted. Police in Westerly, Rhode Island, report Christa Bradley turned herself in after a home security video was posted on Facebook. Police Chief Ed St. Clair says the video shows a woman walking up to Mary Sullivan's front door and walking off with her homemade wreath. The Westerly Sun reports Bradley is now charged with larceny under $1,500 and is due in court in about a month.

PISTOL PACKING HANDBAGS

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) -- Paula Summers has the purse -- for ladies who are packing. She's a Washington state private eye and found it difficult to carry a gun. Summers did some research and found a number of purses designed to carry concealed pistols. But she felt there had to be a better way to market them. So, she's created gun-packers.com -- "for women who pack heat." Her handbags range from $45 to just under a-grand. But there's more to carrying a gun than the right handbag. Summers tells The News Tribune potential gun-owners need to be trained and licensed according to their local laws.

MOOSE FRIENDS

GWINN, Mich. (AP) -- Sunshine and Jumper have some human buddies. Sunshine and Jumper are male moose in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. Food is short, so some people pals have been putting out healthy snacks, like alfalfa, apples and carrots for the moose. The animals have become regulars at an area cabin. The cabin owner asked not to be named by the Grand Rapids Press, so no one will come around to bother the moose. Their human buddies say the moose now eat out of their hands.

 
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