When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors - 06/11/14

Our stormy pattern has been pretty impressive as far as lightning goes.  One night our Skywatch lightning strike count showed over 5,000 strikes with passing storms over middle Tennessee. So I thought I'd write a quick blog about lightning safety, to remind folks how dangerous lightning is.

Lighting is neat to look at, but it can be deadly.  In fact, the National Weather Service claims an average of 53 people will die every year from a lightning strike.  When I visit schools to talk about weather, I'll share the saying "When thunder roars, go indoors".  I think it's a good saying for everyone to know about. 

There is no safe place outside from lightning.  It's best to be inside when a thunderstorm rolls in.  And it's not just for when a thunderstorm is right on top of you, pouring down rain.  Lightning can strike you as a thunderstorm is moving in or moving out.  That's why it's safe to say if you can hear thunder... you're close enough to be struck by lightning.  So, it's best to minimize your risk of being struck by going inside.

Once inside, there are a few things you can do to remain safe indoors.  Here's a list from the National Weather Service:

Key Indoor Safety Tips

  • Stay off corded phones. You can use cellular or cordless phones.
  • Don't touch electrical equipment or cords.
  • Avoid plumbing. Do not wash your hands, take a shower or wash dishes.
  • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.
  • Do not lie on concrete floors or lean against concrete walls

So, the next time you hear thunder... it's time to head indoors.  When thunder roars, go indoors! 



 

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