Hey, we won! Let's destroy something! - 04/08/14

I'll preface this blog by warning it's a bit of a rant but I know there are a lot of you who agree with me.

I don't get it.
Really.
I just don't get it.
WHY do people destroy things when they're happy?
Do sports fans sit around and think "hey, my team just won, I'm going to set a couch on fire!"

Granted, there may be alcohol involved in these decisions, but trashing something when you're thrilled doesn't make sense.  I'd like to pick the brain of a psychologist to get some answers.

I don't have one at my disposal, so I Googled "why do people destroy things when they're happy?" and these headlines popped up:

  1. How Not to Destroy Your Marriage: 8 Tips for Staying a Happy Couple

  2. 6 Things Happy People Never Do - Marc and Angel Hack Life

  3. 8 Bad Reasons to Break Up - eHarmony Advice

  4. 5 clues you're stuck in a dysfunctional relationship

  5. Top 10 Things Women Do To Destroy Their Marriage


So I Googled "why do sports fans burn couches?" and got these headlines:

Photos: Kentucky Fans Are Rioting, Starting Fires After Win Over ...

Kentucky wins basketball game over rival, fans burn couches in ...

WVU takes credit for couch-burning craze that has caught fire at UK ...



IMHO, it's dumb.   It wastes resources and money and it's dangerous.  Setting fires, fighting, flipping cars: these are the kinds of things that happen in war zones or during riots of protest against governments.  These shouldn't be the kinds of things that sports fans do to celebrate victory. 

What if 8 year old little league players won their regional and celebrated by torching the concession stand?  What if little gymnasts celebrated winning a state meet by taking chainsaws to their playgrounds?  Make sense?  Nope.  But that's the kind of example being set by a bunch of morons who apparently don't know any better.

 

Get This

Last Update on April 17, 2015 09:10 GMT

DAVID LETTERMAN-CAPITOL GYROCOPTER

NEW YORK (AP) -- David Letterman will soon retire. But he's not letting a juicy target like the U.S. Capitol gyrocopter landing go unnoticed. Last night, on CBS' "Late Show," Letterman did the Top 10 "questions to ask yourself before landing a gyrocopter on the United States Capitol lawn." Here are a few examples:

No. 8, "Should I do this during Secret Service happy hour?"

No. 2, "Should I land somewhere unguarded, like the White House?"

And No. 1, "Will I be the only person who actually did something in Washington today?"

AIR PUMP THEFTS

NEW YORK (AP) -- Some New York City crooks are getting pumped. The NYPD reports they're looking for two suspects in a string of air pump thefts from gas stations in Brooklyn and Queens. Seventeen such incidents have been reported since late December, the latest being earlier this month. Investigators report the pump bandits attach tow chains to snatch the coin-operated air pumps. The pumps can hold up to a few thousand bucks worth of change apiece.

MARIJUANA-BIKE TIRES

DOUGLAS, Ariz. (AP) -- Two Arizona teens are in trouble -- after federal officers say they tried smuggling pot hidden in bike tires. Customs and Border Patrol Enforcement officers report finding a total of seven pounds of marijuana inside the tires. A drug-sniffing dog alerted customs officers as a 17-year-old boy and a 17-year-old girl crossed the border. The bikes were seized. The teens have been turned over to Homeland Security investigators.

CELLMATES-HOLE-DIGGING CHARGES

PITTSBURGH (AP) -- It's no Shawshank Redemption. Two men are charged with digging a hole in a cinderblock cell wall in a western Pennsylvania jail. They didn't get very far. Somerset County Jail Warden Gregory Briggs says the hole was only about four inches wide. Joseph Lee Bockes and Billy Ray Naill now face charges that include institutional vandalism. Authorities didn't file attempted escape charges because the hole was so small. The Somerset Daily American first reported the story.

 
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