Hey, we won! Let's destroy something! - 04/08/14

I'll preface this blog by warning it's a bit of a rant but I know there are a lot of you who agree with me.

I don't get it.
Really.
I just don't get it.
WHY do people destroy things when they're happy?
Do sports fans sit around and think "hey, my team just won, I'm going to set a couch on fire!"

Granted, there may be alcohol involved in these decisions, but trashing something when you're thrilled doesn't make sense.  I'd like to pick the brain of a psychologist to get some answers.

I don't have one at my disposal, so I Googled "why do people destroy things when they're happy?" and these headlines popped up:

  1. How Not to Destroy Your Marriage: 8 Tips for Staying a Happy Couple

  2. 6 Things Happy People Never Do - Marc and Angel Hack Life

  3. 8 Bad Reasons to Break Up - eHarmony Advice

  4. 5 clues you're stuck in a dysfunctional relationship

  5. Top 10 Things Women Do To Destroy Their Marriage


So I Googled "why do sports fans burn couches?" and got these headlines:

Photos: Kentucky Fans Are Rioting, Starting Fires After Win Over ...

Kentucky wins basketball game over rival, fans burn couches in ...

WVU takes credit for couch-burning craze that has caught fire at UK ...



IMHO, it's dumb.   It wastes resources and money and it's dangerous.  Setting fires, fighting, flipping cars: these are the kinds of things that happen in war zones or during riots of protest against governments.  These shouldn't be the kinds of things that sports fans do to celebrate victory. 

What if 8 year old little league players won their regional and celebrated by torching the concession stand?  What if little gymnasts celebrated winning a state meet by taking chainsaws to their playgrounds?  Make sense?  Nope.  But that's the kind of example being set by a bunch of morons who apparently don't know any better.

 

Get This

Last Update on January 29, 2015 10:33 GMT

SUPER BOWL SUPERFAN

WINFIELD, Pa. (AP) -- Super Bowl 49 will be the 49th for superfan Tom Henschel. Yes, he's been to every Super Bowl, starting with the first one in 1967 at the Los Angeles Coliseum. He plans to be at the University of Phoenix Stadium for Sunday's big game between the Seattle Seahawks and the New England Patriots. The Pennsylvania man is one of just three people to have seen every Super Bowl. But the big game wasn't always such a big deal. Henschel tells the Valley News Dispatch there were only 30,000 fans in the stadium for Super Bowl 1. The 73-year-old says he plans to party like a 20-year-old in Phoenix this weekend.

CITIZENS' ARREST

HAMILTON, Mont. (AP) -- It was a citizens' arrest with the handyman's best friend -- duct tape. Authorities report a Montana man was taped-up by fellow bar patrons, after they say he tried to hit a bartender. Jeremy A. Estep was busted in front of the Rustic Hut in Florence, Montana. According to court records, Estep was kicked out of the place. Witnesses say he returned, began arguing with the bartender and tried hitting him with a glass. A female bartender told officers she grabbed his arm and other customers took him to the ground and duct-taped his wrists. The Ravalli Republic reports Estep now faces a number of charges, including felony assault.

RITA'S ITALIAN ICE-MIDDLE EAST

PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- It's a cool dessert for the hot desert. Rita's Italian Ice is coming to the Middle East. The Pennsylvania-based chain say it's signed a deal to open nearly 50 stores in Turkey, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and five other Arab nations. Rita's contractor (Faysal Younes) says the region's climate makes it a natural for the sweet, frozen treats. The Mideast expansion is to take place over the next decade.

SMITHSONIAN-RECORDED SOUND

WASHINGTON (AP) -- There's something new to see and hear at the National Museum of American History. The Washington museum is hosting an exhibit called "Hear My Voice," focusing on early sound recording. The exhibit includes some of the earliest audio recordings made by Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone. New technology makes it possible to scan the groves in the wax discs made in the 1880s. The exhibit runs through October.

 
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