Marathon -- a matter of perspective - 04/21/14

  The Boston Marathon is run today. And I bet I can change your perspective on it. Not the part about last year's bombing, but about running of 26.2 miles.

  If you're a runner, as my wife is -- she's run the New York Marathon and the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, DC -- you no doubt put in hours on the road, with no medal at the end and no fans lining the streets cheering you on. You've run in rain and cold and on days you didn't really feel like doing it. And you've looked at your watch and clocked your time and continued to push yourself beyond what you did yesterday, or the day before that. And you're not really sure why you do it, except that you have to, even though it's going to take you hours longer to do something the winner does in what seems like a flash. This will make you feel better.

  I was watching coverage of the Boston Marathon one year and saw them interviewing the winner. He won it with a time of something like 2:06 or 2:08, something crazy fast. So they asked him, "You ran the marathon in just over two hours. How do you feel about all those people out there who won't finish it in under five hours?"

  "That's amazing," he said. "I could never run for five hours straight."

  Feel better?

 

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